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Living wisely in uncertain times

Living wisely in uncertain times

by Philip S. Powell, Friday 6th September 2019 A friend of mine recently commented while discussing Brexit that we are living through one of the most tumultuous and uncertain periods in British history. I don’t think this is hyperbole. We are, as a country, facing an unknown and uncertain future as the date (31 October) […]

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Embodied and placed

Embodied and placed

by Jonathan Tame, Thursday 11th July 2019 Do we have a compelling theology of environmental responsibility?  This was the question put to me a few months ago, and since then it’s become all the more pertinent as major protests are being made for urgent action on biodiversity loss, climate change, plastics pollution and more.  Are […]

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Public leaders and the slow formation of character

Public leaders and the slow formation of character

by Mercedes McGuire, 4th July 2019 The currency of formation in the natural world is time – little happens without it. Seedlings grow up to become strong oaks not in years, but over decades and centuries. The strength and reliability of an oak only happens through the process. There is no way to short-circuit this […]

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The worker deserves his wages: the Bible and remuneration

The worker deserves his wages: the Bible and remuneration

by Charlee New, Thursday 20th June 2019 The systems and practices of paying workers (or, as it is formally known, ‘remuneration’) affect the lives of all employed adults, and by extension, their families and households. Yet, how often would you hear a sermon on the subject? It might come as some surprise to realise that […]

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‘Let nothing be wasted’: learning from Jesus’ food ethics

‘Let nothing be wasted’: learning from Jesus’ food ethics

by Andrew Phillips, Friday 24th May 2019 Jesus then took the loaves, gave thanks, and distributed to those who were seated as much as they wanted. He did the same with the fish. When they had all had enough to eat, he said to his disciples, “Gather the pieces that are left over. Let nothing be wasted.” […]

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Love thy neighbour, love thy planet

Love thy neighbour, love thy planet

By Hannah Eves, Thursday 16th May 2019. Why the environment is an inherently relational issue.

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Why do we need the evangelical statement on Artificial Intelligence?

Why do we need the evangelical statement on Artificial Intelligence?

by Charlee New, 9th May 2019 In April, the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention released a new evangelical statement of principles on—you guessed it—artificial intelligence. If you’ve read any of our output lately, you’ll also notice that we’ve recently published a new report: Artificially Intelligent: grappling with the myths, present […]

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Wisdom cries out in the public square

Wisdom cries out in the public square

by Philip S. Powell, 25th April 2019 Christians in the West seem to really struggle to articulate, commend and defend the Bible’s perspective on the big issues affecting society. Sadly, we either privatise our faith to Sunday morning — divorced from the harsh realities of economics and politics — or, as some are trying to […]

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The Conversational God

The Conversational God

by Jonathan Tame, 3rd April 2019 You might know this story already – but even if you do, it’s no bad thing to hear it again. Retelling the foundational story of any movement or organisation is key to preserving its values and transmitting its purpose. It began with the question, ‘How does the Bible view […]

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Supporting the bereaved

Supporting the bereaved

by Peter Redmayne, Wednesday 27th March At the end of February Theresa May announced that she would belatedly create a Child Funeral Fund to pay the costs of all children’s funerals in England. This comes 11 months after she made the initial promise, following a campaign by MP Carolyn Harris. Child funerals are already free […]

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Engaging in Politics in times of Political Crisis

Engaging in Politics in times of Political Crisis

by Philip Powell, 22nd March 2019. The Brexit crisis has overwhelmed almost everyone who cares about the issue and the feelings of exhaustion and confusion seem unbearable. The temptation now is to switch off and go to sleep, hoping the politicians and civil-servants will at some point come to some solution.

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The Prodigal Runaway: On Shamima Begum

The Prodigal Runaway: On Shamima Begum

by Hannah Eves, Thursday 14th March 2019 On Monday, Irish PM Leo Varadkar said that it is not right to remove citizenship from Lisa Smith, a suspected ISIS recruit, because, ‘ultimately, this is an Irish citizen, and we don’t believe that [it] would be either the right or compassionate thing to do’. In contrast, Sajid […]

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The cry of Tamar

The cry of Tamar

by Katherine Ladd, 8th March 2019 ‘“No…” she said to him. “Don’t force me! Don’t do this wicked thing. What about me?” …But he refused to listen to her, and since he was stronger than she, he raped her… and said, “Get this woman out of my sight and bolt the door”… And Tamar lived […]

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Responding like Jesus: accountability, repentance and forgiveness

Responding like Jesus: accountability, repentance and forgiveness

by Andrew Philips, 6th March 2019 In the last few weeks, in the state of Virginia, the three most important statewide elected officials (all Democrats) have been mired in scandal. A photo in Governor Ralph Northam’s medical yearbook was published, showing two people, one in blackface, the other in a Klu Klux Klan robe. Northam […]

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School strikes, environmental theology and Psalm 8

School strikes, environmental theology and Psalm 8

by Charlee New, 25th February 2019 The last few months have been significant for youth environmental activism. Inspired by sixteen-year-old activist Greta Thunberg, tens of thousands of schoolchildren across the world have been striking from school in protest over climate change. This is not an exaggeration; in the February 15th strikes (according to the protest […]

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St Columbanus, the patron saint of Europe

St Columbanus, the patron saint of Europe

by Katherine Martin, 14th Feb 2019. There is nothing new under the sun. As the continent of Europe undergoes political and social changes, including protests, changing political landscapes and deeply divided public discourse, we can remind ourselves that these are new expressions of an age-old story.

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Media: The architect of perspective?

Media: The architect of perspective?

by Mercedes McGuire, Thursday 7th February 2019 There is war in Yemen, a polar vortex in Canada and a measles outbreak in the Philippines. The USA is experiencing the longest shutdown in its history over the construction of a wall. Venezuela is experiencing a ‘slow motion catastrophe’, and energy prices are rising for millions. And […]

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If we want to renew democracy, we should use our emotions more intelligently

If we want to renew democracy, we should use our emotions more intelligently

by Hannah Eves, Wednesday 6th February 2019 If emotional intelligence is ‘the capacity to be aware of, control and express emotion in a way that handles relationships in a judicious and empathetic way’, then we are certainly in need of more emotional intelligence in Westminster. Indeed, practicing wisdom in the expression of emotion has strong […]

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Taking sides on Brexit

Taking sides on Brexit

by Jonathan Tame, 29th January 2019 We’ve been asked to end a relative radio silence from Jubilee Centre about Brexit, ever since Mrs May came back from Brussels with a negotiated exit deal with the EU in November. What is a Christian response to the bewildering parliamentary pantomime we’re currently watching of MPs trying to deal […]

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Government shutdown: conflict management or a heart for resolution?

Government shutdown: conflict management or a heart for resolution?

by Peter Redmayne, 28th January 2019 On Friday the US Congress and President Donald Trump signed off on a law allowing the US federal government to reopen for three weeks. At 35 days (closed since the 22nd December), this has been the longest shutdown in US history. The cause of the shutdown was Trump’s refusal […]

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