RSSBlogs

Good Omens and the problem of the end of the world

Good Omens and the problem of the end of the world

by Charlee New, 20th February 2020 If there’s one thing most Christians in the UK are longing to talk about with those around them, it’s probably not the end of the world. In fact, discussing the apocalypse feels like the worst (or perhaps the most distasteful) evangelistic strategy. You want to make honest connections with […]

Continue Reading

Global protests and the nature of hope

Global protests and the nature of hope

by Mercedes McGuire, Thursday 23rd January 2020 In 2019, men and women around the world took to the streets to voice their deep dissatisfaction with the current state of affairs. Chile, Columbia, Hong Kong, Lebanon, Iran, France, Spain, Sudan and Algeria are but a few of the 47 countries which have been marked by waves […]

Continue Reading

When God asks the questions

When God asks the questions

Why God’s four questions in Genesis 3 should still be asked today by Jonathan Tame, Thursday 16th January 2020 As I prepared some thoughts to share with the Jubilee Centre team at the start of 2020, I turned to Genesis 3:1-13, the account of how sin came into the world. There, God asks four searching […]

Continue Reading

Why Family Matters

Why Family Matters

by Jonathan Tame, Monday 6th January 2019 ‘Reactivating the Extended Family’ was the title of Jubilee Centre’s first ever research report, on how a biblical social vision could be applied to public policy in Britain.  35 years later, we are revisiting the subject and making it a theme in 2020. It also marks Jubilee Centre’s […]

Continue Reading

A climate election?

A climate election?

by Andrew Phillips, Monday 9th December 2019 For the UK, 2019 will be a year that draws to a close with a general election. But, regardless of what happens on December 12, the year 2019 will also be remembered as a hugely significant one for the issues of climate, nature and the environment. This year […]

Continue Reading

The context and content of the Nativity

The context and content of the Nativity

by Jonathan Tame, Monday 9th December 2019 With just three days till the General Election on December 12th, whatever the outcome is we do know that many things are about to change: there will be a new parliament and new government, to be followed almost certainly by a new economic relationship with the EU, and […]

Continue Reading

Eliminating hurry in a restless society

Eliminating hurry in a restless society

Thursday 28th November 2019 Andrew Phillips reviews John Mark Comer’s latest book The Ruthless Elimination of Hurry (October 2019) Imagine this scene: you meet a friend walking down the road, so you stop for a chat. Since you haven’t seen your friend for a few days, you ask that standard opening question: “How’s your week […]

Continue Reading

The Brexit Election: What Really Matters?

The Brexit Election: What Really Matters?

by Guy Brandon, Wednesday 20th November When the dust settles, Westminster might look very different but there will be far more that hasn’t changed for the country. As Christians, it’s vital we don’t lose sight of our true priorities – and that we work to prevent matters getting worse in the meantime. Like it or […]

Continue Reading

Living wage week and biblical justice

Living wage week and biblical justice

by Charlee New and Jonathan Tame, Monday 11th November 2019 As a society, we’re committed to two principles regarding wages, but they are in tension.  One is to allow the market to set prices as much as possible, and the other is to protect employees, particularly those at risk of falling into poverty. This tension […]

Continue Reading

Make elections great again!

Make elections great again!

by Philip S. Powell, Thursday 7th November 2019 After weeks of unpredictable, intense and chaotic drama surrounding Brexit (including the bizarre possibility of finding our Prime Minister lying dead in a ditch), the 31st October deadline was something of an anti-climax. The EU agreed to extend the Brexit deadline until 31st January 2020 without too […]

Continue Reading

God and the wicket? The community value of cricket

God and the wicket? The community value of cricket

By Matt Williams, 23rd October 2019 This is a post from our guest researcher Matt Williams. He turns us back to the summer to ask whether the cricket world cup matters in God’s design. Anybody with the slightest understanding of cricket will have been transfixed by the events of this summer. On 14th July, New […]

Continue Reading

The Samaritan strategy

The Samaritan strategy

by Jonathan Tame, Monday 10th October 2019 ‘Never discuss religion or politics with those who hold opinions opposite to yours; they are subjects that heat in handling, until they burn your fingers,’ wrote Thomas Haliburton in 1840. Discussing politics is all the more incendiary today, because so much of that debate now takes place online, […]

Continue Reading

Living wisely in uncertain times

Living wisely in uncertain times

by Philip S. Powell, Friday 6th September 2019 A friend of mine recently commented while discussing Brexit that we are living through one of the most tumultuous and uncertain periods in British history. I don’t think this is hyperbole. We are, as a country, facing an unknown and uncertain future as the date (31 October) […]

Continue Reading

Embodied and placed

Embodied and placed

by Jonathan Tame, Thursday 11th July 2019 Do we have a compelling theology of environmental responsibility?  This was the question put to me a few months ago, and since then it’s become all the more pertinent as major protests are being made for urgent action on biodiversity loss, climate change, plastics pollution and more.  Are […]

Continue Reading

Public leaders and the slow formation of character

Public leaders and the slow formation of character

by Mercedes McGuire, 4th July 2019 The currency of formation in the natural world is time – little happens without it. Seedlings grow up to become strong oaks not in years, but over decades and centuries. The strength and reliability of an oak only happens through the process. There is no way to short-circuit this […]

Continue Reading

The worker deserves his wages: the Bible and remuneration

The worker deserves his wages: the Bible and remuneration

by Charlee New, Thursday 20th June 2019 The systems and practices of paying workers (or, as it is formally known, ‘remuneration’) affect the lives of all employed adults, and by extension, their families and households. Yet, how often would you hear a sermon on the subject? It might come as some surprise to realise that […]

Continue Reading

‘Let nothing be wasted’: learning from Jesus’ food ethics

‘Let nothing be wasted’: learning from Jesus’ food ethics

by Andrew Phillips, Friday 24th May 2019 Jesus then took the loaves, gave thanks, and distributed to those who were seated as much as they wanted. He did the same with the fish. When they had all had enough to eat, he said to his disciples, “Gather the pieces that are left over. Let nothing be wasted.” […]

Continue Reading

Love thy neighbour, love thy planet

Love thy neighbour, love thy planet

By Hannah Eves, Thursday 16th May 2019. Why the environment is an inherently relational issue.

Continue Reading

Why do we need the evangelical statement on Artificial Intelligence?

Why do we need the evangelical statement on Artificial Intelligence?

by Charlee New, 9th May 2019 In April, the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention released a new evangelical statement of principles on—you guessed it—artificial intelligence. If you’ve read any of our output lately, you’ll also notice that we’ve recently published a new report: Artificially Intelligent: grappling with the myths, present […]

Continue Reading

Wisdom cries out in the public square

Wisdom cries out in the public square

by Philip S. Powell, 25th April 2019 Christians in the West seem to really struggle to articulate, commend and defend the Bible’s perspective on the big issues affecting society. Sadly, we either privatise our faith to Sunday morning — divorced from the harsh realities of economics and politics — or, as some are trying to […]

Continue Reading