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Billy Graham (1918 – 2018)

Billy Graham (1918 – 2018)

by Philip S. Powell, 21st February 2018 World-renowned evangelist Billy Graham died today. He was one of Christianity’s most recognised and celebrated leaders of the twentieth century. From his humble beginnings as a farm boy in North Carolina, to becoming friends with US presidents and other world leaders, his impact was felt across the decades. It is estimated […]

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When Christians disagree, does it matter ‘how’?

When Christians disagree, does it matter ‘how’?

by Philip S. Powell, 15th February 2018 Over the past two thousand years of church history Christians have disagreed, sometimes harshly and violently, on almost everything from trivial matters to profound theological questions. Even deciding on what is trivial and what is not sometimes has led to major disagreement and breakdown of relationship. In the […]

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An Unreasonable Commitment?

An Unreasonable Commitment?

Guest Post by Jeff Fountain, 7th February 2018 Marriage Week UK runs from the 7th-14th February and is a national campaign which seeks to highlight the benefits of healthy marriage to society, media and governments, whilst seeking to educate and inform couples regarding the benefits of marriage.  To expect marriages to last till ‘death do us […]

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The Ethics of Remuneration

The Ethics of Remuneration

by Calum Samuelson, 1st February 2018 At the beginning of this year, a story about so-called Fat Cat Thursday made the headlines. It marked the point (less than three working days into the new year) at which the earnings of FTSE 100 CEOs passed the average annual salary of UK workers (a ratio of 120 […]

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Could the Housing Crisis Strengthen Welfare?

Could the Housing Crisis Strengthen Welfare?

by Jonathan Tame, 25th January 2018 Following on from his work on how Reformation-era Geneva can help us to re-imagine social welfare, Jonathan Tame reflects on the opportunities presented by the UK housing crisis to strengthen welfare and prevent social isolation. When the medieval city of Geneva faced a housing crisis, caused by the influx of fellow […]

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Robots in Our Image: Three Critical Questions

Robots in Our Image: Three Critical Questions

by Charlee New, 18th Jan 2018. Sophia the robot is back in the news at the 2017 Consumer Electronics Convention. The creation of Hanson Robotics, Sophia is becoming something of a minor celebrity, making headlines last October when it was granted citizenship by Saudi Arabia. More recently, it’s been given legs and has been reported as having taken its ‘first steps’.

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Whose Resolutions? Goal-Setting, Individualism and the Bible

Whose Resolutions? Goal-Setting, Individualism and the Bible

by Calum Samuelson, 11th January 2018 As we begin 2018, my mind turns to the perpetual project of crafting New Year’s Resolutions. Making careful plans for the future should certainly be commended by Christians (cf. Luke 14:28-31; Proverbs 15:22), but I’d like to take a closer look at a practice that is largely prompted by cultural […]

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Two Public Leadership Issues for 2018

Two Public Leadership Issues for 2018

by Jonathan Tame, 4th January 2018 At the Jubilee Centre, we are constantly engaged in working out what it means to think biblically about public life today. It is good to be wise to the trends which are shaping public life, and as I look ahead to 2018, two dilemmas around public leadership concern me. The first […]

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Devotional Reading in the Digital Age

Devotional Reading in the Digital Age

by Charlee New, 22nd November 2017 In the 16th century, Western culture experienced a massive shift in how the general population engaged with the Bible. With the rising literacy rates, developments in print production and the translation of the Bible into vernacular languages, biblical literacy was on the rise—and the medium of engagement was the printed page. […]

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The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh: Why 70 years of marriage still matters

The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh: Why 70 years of marriage still matters

by Philip S. Powell, 20th November 2017 Today, Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip celebrate seventy years of married life. Queen Elizabeth, who is the longest reigning monarch in British history, has now become the first British monarch to celebrate a platinum wedding anniversary, whilst Prince Philip has become the longest serving consort to the British Sovereign. […]

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The Robots Are Coming: Us, Them and God

The Robots Are Coming: Us, Them and God

by Charlee New, 24th October 2017 What will it mean for the church when the robotics revolution arrives? How will our concept of human beings, created in God’s image, change? How can we prepare for this rapid transition which may bring an end to work as we know it? With the robotics revolution drawing closer […]

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The Gospel and the City: Movement Day UK 2017

The Gospel and the City: Movement Day UK 2017

On the 6-7th October, three team members from Jubilee Centre attended Movement Day UK, a two-day event bringing together Christians working in business, the church, education, politics and the arts to consider how we might see our cities transformed. This nationwide conversation focused on the words of the prophet Jeremiah: ‘Seek the peace and prosperity […]

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Deceptively Simple

Deceptively Simple

by Jonathan Tame, 11th October 2017 In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus uses two everyday analogies to describe the action of God’s people in the world: salt and light.  Christians often attach a ‘salt and light’ label rather freely on different initiatives, but I have been discovering that a closer study of Matthew 5:13-16 yields […]

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Horses, Robots, and Donald Trump

Horses, Robots, and Donald Trump

by Josh Parikh, 6th September 2017 In 1920, the number of horses in the USA was the highest it’s ever been. Horses had seen wave after wave of technological innovation, from better stirrups to chariots to even the rise of the railroads and train. An optimistic horse might have looked at the advent of cars […]

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Could a robot have moral status?

Could a robot have moral status?

by Josh Parikh, 15th August 2017 From the Terminator to R2D2, science fiction has offered a vision of robots not merely as extraordinarily capable, but as objects worthy of moral treatment. Once relegated to science fiction, the rapid development of the Robotics Revolution makes these questions ever more relevant. Traditionally, Christians have been sceptical, assuming […]

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Art and social transformation

Art and social transformation

by Jonathan Tame, 3rd July 2017. As a research-based organisation promoting Christian social reform, it’s not surprising that Jubilee Centre’s output is primarily in the form of words.  However, personal and social transformation are unlikely to take place through words alone – no matter how eloquent our language or convincing our arguments. Sgt Pepper’s Lonely […]

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Listening to the voice of Silence

Listening to the voice of Silence

by Philip S. Powell, 30th June 2017 Recently I watched Martin Scorsese’s film Silence, an adaptation of Japanese writer Shusaku Endo’s book ‘Silence’ (1966). I had read Endo’s book a few years back and was eagerly waiting to watch the film on big screen. Nothing prepared me for what I experienced as I watched this […]

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The serious business of elections

The serious business of elections

by Guy Brandon, 7th June 2017 It’s the eve of the General Election. Again. And, like the last General Election two years ago and the referendum a year ago, we’re being asked to make a decision that will fundamentally impact the nature of our society and will have far-reaching effects for all of us. It […]

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The Brexit election?

The Brexit election?

by Guy Brandon. The news of a snap General Election came as a surprise to just about everyone, apparently including most government ministers, though more cynical readers might think it was a long-planned exercise.

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Driverless shuttle bus heralds robot invasion?

Driverless shuttle bus heralds robot invasion?

by Guy Brandon, 10th April 2017 A driverless shuttle bus is to be tested by the public in London. The bus will operate on a pathway also used by pedestrians and cyclists, can ‘see’ 100m ahead and will stop if anything crosses its path. Driverless vehicles are just one development set to have far-reaching implications […]

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