Tag: SAGE

Review: The Way We Eat Now

Review: The Way We Eat Now

by Andrew Phillips, 7th June 2019 Modern eating has changed radically, in ways that would have been unimaginable even fifty years ago. That is the thesis of food writer Bee Wilson, as set out in her book, The Way We Eat Now, published in March 2019. Food may seem mundane and ordinary, and so we rarely stop to think about modern ways of eating. […]

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A breath of fresh, salty air: the power of story for ‘hiking homeless’

A breath of fresh, salty air: the power of story for ‘hiking homeless’

A review of The Salt Path by Raynor Winnby Hannah Eves, 27th February 2019 Raynor Winn’s tale of her and her husband’s destitution is a story that must be heard in our public conversation. She charts the emotional and physical journey of her and her husband Moth as they walk the 630-mile path on the coast of […]

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Who can we trust?

Who can we trust?

by Peter Redmayne, 25th February 2019.
Who can you trust? In an era of fake news, out-of-touch political elites and even ‘deepfake’ videos, trust is under severe strain. It’s something many of us instinctively feel however, what we may not realise, is that we trust different groups of people in society differently. Though (remarkably) 70% of British people would say that most people in their neighbourhood can be trusted, only 35% have trust in national Government. Academic Rachel Botsman in her book Who Can You Trust? (2017), identifies three different types of trust. The first is ‘local trust’ – the type that humans enjoyed for thousands of years, where they could base their decisions on the views of their friends and family and others living near them.

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Insect collapse

Insect collapse

by Andrew Phillips, 14th February 2019 Human activity in history has often affected animal populations. The most infamous is probably the Dodo, which became extinct in the seventeenth century due to human activity on the island of Mauritius. In our own time, it is well known that numbers of some species are declining sharply – with certain iconic animals such as elephants and tigers often being highlighted. But the decline of these prominent mammals is only a very small part of a much wider global problem, which is increasingly affecting all types of animals. This is the case with insects: their numbers are falling at such an alarming rate that it has been called an ‘insect collapse’. A recent study found that over 40% of insect species are threatened by extinction, and the authors estimate that the total mass of insects worldwide is declining at a rate of 2.5% per year. The rate of insect extinction is eight times faster than that of larger animals (mammals, birds and reptiles). This is not just a long-term trend, either: some insect populations have collapsed in just a few years. In the United States, the monarch butterfly population fell by 90% in just 20 years. An annual study conducted in nature reserves in Germany has seen insect numbers decline by 76% since 1989. In the Luquillo rainforest in Puerto Rico, a shocking 98% of ground insects disappeared over a period of just 35 years.

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Our relationship with objects: on Marie Kondo

Our relationship with objects: on Marie Kondo

Reflections on how we can relate better to objects in light of a relational God by Hannah Eves, 28th January 2019 This January’s Netflix offering comes in the form of Tidying Up with Marie Kondo. Kondo’s method has since sparked numerous comment pieces, offending book lovers the most with her decluttering method. As one disgruntled bibliophile put it, […]

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Doing research biblically

Doing research biblically

by Peter Redmayne, 22nd January 2019 Welcome to the first SAGE blog post! This is a space where we will be writing about what we are learning as part of Jubilee Centre’s SAGE Graduate Programme and where we will apply it to think biblically about current issues. This post will tell you about our group […]

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